Book of the dead the key

book of the dead the key

Interwetten ist ein deutscher Anbieter von Casino bis zu в vergГtet und in den in ihrem Lieblingscasino direkt Beste Spielothek in Gesseln finden ihrem. März The Walking Dead: Season Two Steam Key GLOBAL. Mit "Book of the Dead" hat Unity Technologies ein Video einer Techdemo zur. (=Nr. 5) 66 BLACKDEN, M.W., Some Fragments from the Book of the Dead, in: The Two Key Figures of the Ancient Egyptian Religion, SHR 26, Leiden Dynastie, aus verschiedenen Urkunden zusammengestellt. Handbuch zu den Mumienbinden https: Skip to main content. Proudly powered by WordPress. Certain of the Dead. No returns or exchanges. There is no refunds or returns on custom or commissioned orders. Structure and Usage, edited by M. Book of the Dead. Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. More to the point, the spells are cally from the pyramid walls and wooden coffins of arranged in a sequence typical of the New Kingdom, prior eras, but its essential purpose — to guarantee beginning at the head end of the coffin with Coffin the post-mortem transfiguration of the tomb owner Text , which was to emerge as Book of the Dead into a glorified spirit — remains the same, and its di- utterance 17, often used as the opening spell on later rect evolution can be traced from a number of dispa- papyrus scrolls Munro , pp. Gods, Spirits, and Demons of the Book of the Dead. An Egyp- through the Afterlife:

Book Of The Dead The Key Video

Darksiders 2 - All Book of the Dead Page Locations (The Book of the Dead Trophy / Achievement)

From this period onward the Book of the Dead was typically written on a papyrus scroll, and the text illustrated with vignettes. During the 19th dynasty in particular, the vignettes tended to be lavish, sometimes at the expense of the surrounding text.

In the Third Intermediate Period , the Book of the Dead started to appear in hieratic script, as well as in the traditional hieroglyphics.

The hieratic scrolls were a cheaper version, lacking illustration apart from a single vignette at the beginning, and were produced on smaller papyri.

At the same time, many burials used additional funerary texts, for instance the Amduat. During the 25th and 26th dynasties , the Book of the Dead was updated, revised and standardised.

Spells were consistently ordered and numbered for the first time. In the Late period and Ptolemaic period , the Book of the Dead remained based on the Saite recension, though increasingly abbreviated towards the end of the Ptolemaic period.

The last use of the Book of the Dead was in the 1st century BCE, though some artistic motifs drawn from it were still in use in Roman times.

The Book of the Dead is made up of a number of individual texts and their accompanying illustrations. Most sub-texts begin with the word ro, which can mean "mouth," "speech," "spell," "utterance," "incantation," or "a chapter of a book.

At present, some spells are known, [15] though no single manuscript contains them all. They served a range of purposes. Some are intended to give the deceased mystical knowledge in the afterlife, or perhaps to identify them with the gods: Still others protect the deceased from various hostile forces or guide him through the underworld past various obstacles.

Famously, two spells also deal with the judgement of the deceased in the Weighing of the Heart ritual. Such spells as 26—30, and sometimes spells 6 and , relate to the heart and were inscribed on scarabs.

The texts and images of the Book of the Dead were magical as well as religious. Magic was as legitimate an activity as praying to the gods, even when the magic was aimed at controlling the gods themselves.

The act of speaking a ritual formula was an act of creation; [20] there is a sense in which action and speech were one and the same thing.

Hieroglyphic script was held to have been invented by the god Thoth , and the hieroglyphs themselves were powerful. Written words conveyed the full force of a spell.

The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life.

A number of spells are for magical amulets , which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.

Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value. Almost every Book of the Dead was unique, containing a different mixture of spells drawn from the corpus of texts available.

For most of the history of the Book of the Dead there was no defined order or structure. The spells in the Book of the Dead depict Egyptian beliefs about the nature of death and the afterlife.

The Book of the Dead is a vital source of information about Egyptian beliefs in this area. One aspect of death was the disintegration of the various kheperu , or modes of existence.

Mummification served to preserve and transform the physical body into sah , an idealised form with divine aspects; [29] the Book of the Dead contained spells aimed at preserving the body of the deceased, which may have been recited during the process of mummification.

The ka , or life-force, remained in the tomb with the dead body, and required sustenance from offerings of food, water and incense.

In case priests or relatives failed to provide these offerings, Spell ensured the ka was satisfied. It was the ba , depicted as a human-headed bird, which could "go forth by day" from the tomb into the world; spells 61 and 89 acted to preserve it.

An akh was a blessed spirit with magical powers who would dwell among the gods. The nature of the afterlife which the dead person enjoyed is difficult to define, because of the differing traditions within Ancient Egyptian religion.

In the Book of the Dead , the dead were taken into the presence of the god Osiris , who was confined to the subterranean Duat.

There are also spells to enable the ba or akh of the dead to join Ra as he travelled the sky in his sun-barque, and help him fight off Apep.

There are fields, crops, oxen, people and waterways. The deceased person is shown encountering the Great Ennead , a group of gods, as well as his or her own parents.

While the depiction of the Field of Reeds is pleasant and plentiful, it is also clear that manual labour is required.

For this reason burials included a number of statuettes named shabti , or later ushebti. The path to the afterlife as laid out in the Book of the Dead was a difficult one.

The deceased was required to pass a series of gates, caverns and mounds guarded by supernatural creatures. Their names—for instance, "He who lives on snakes" or "He who dances in blood"—are equally grotesque.

These creatures had to be pacified by reciting the appropriate spells included in the Book of the Dead ; once pacified they posed no further threat, and could even extend their protection to the dead person.

If all the obstacles of the Duat could be negotiated, the deceased would be judged in the "Weighing of the Heart" ritual, depicted in Spell The deceased was led by the god Anubis into the presence of Osiris.

There, the dead person swore that he had not committed any sin from a list of 42 sins , [44] reciting a text known as the "Negative Confession".

Maat was often represented by an ostrich feather, the hieroglyphic sign for her name. If the scales balanced, this meant the deceased had led a good life.

Anubis would take them to Osiris and they would find their place in the afterlife, becoming maa-kheru , meaning "vindicated" or "true of voice".

This scene is remarkable not only for its vividness but as one of the few parts of the Book of the Dead with any explicit moral content.

The judgment of the dead and the Negative Confession were a representation of the conventional moral code which governed Egyptian society.

For every "I have not John Taylor points out the wording of Spells 30B and suggests a pragmatic approach to morality; by preventing the heart from contradicting him with any inconvenient truths, it seems that the deceased could enter the afterlife even if their life had not been entirely pure.

A Book of the Dead papyrus was produced to order by scribes. They were commissioned by people in preparation for their own funeral, or by the relatives of someone recently deceased.

They were expensive items; one source gives the price of a Book of the Dead scroll as one deben of silver, [51] perhaps half the annual pay of a labourer.

In one case, a Book of the Dead was written on second-hand papyrus. Most owners of the Book of the Dead were evidently part of the social elite; they were initially reserved for the royal family, but later papyri are found in the tombs of scribes, priests and officials.

Towards the beginning of the history of the Book of the Dead , there are roughly 10 copies belonging to men for every one for a woman.

I feel many of us at that age can relate to boring first office jobs, wanting to get away from home and few friends which can lead to bad judgement at times.

Plot twists, spooky atmosphere and an interesting mystery makes for a very happy reader. I recommend this book highly. Feb 09, Daniel rated it it was ok.

I really am debating between two and three stars. The book is a mystery that goes back and forth between and The side of the story is far more interesting, and the characters are reasonably more likable.

Unfortunately the story is the main story, and the main character is a total loser. She is supposedly a super smart engineer that is driven to succeed, but she continually smokes, gets drunk, sleeps around, and is all around lazy.

I did not sympathize with her at all. I also I really am debating between two and three stars. It is too long of a book to read about characters you kind of hate.

View all 6 comments. Iris Latch is unhappy in her new job at a Cleveland engineering firm. She gets handed grunt work to do Then, out of nowhere, she is asked to complete a special project.

She is to draw floor plans for the First Bank of Cleveland building. The bank closed 20 years before in after a scandal of some sort involving s Iris Latch is unhappy in her new job at a Cleveland engineering firm.

The bank closed 20 years before in after a scandal of some sort involving safe deposit boxes and incomplete banking records.

Iris has no idea when she enters the dusty time capsule of dusty marble and gold trim that a young bank employee stumbled on a crime so big that it imploded some of the wealthiest families in Cleveland and ruined The First Bank of Cleveland.

A crime so big that it is still very dangerous to go poking around the dark, closed building. Beatrice in and Iris in will share in the fear very, very soon, even if they are 20 years apart in time.

This is such a suspenseful and interesting story!! I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Emily Sutton-Smith, and the details are so vivid that I could imagine being in that dusty, dark creepy bank building.

The time jumps just heightened the suspense, rather than making the plot confusing. I felt sorry for both women and could imagine how scary both situations would be.

The suspense and mystery build until the very last page of this story! Best suspense story I have come across in a long time!

The story kept my attention to the very end. The audiobook is just under 14 hours long. Emily Sutton-Smith read at a nice even pace, and her voice was perfect!

I have hearing loss, and sometimes female voices are difficult for me to understand. But I had no problem hearing and understanding this audiobook.

I am definitely going to read more by D. Mar 01, Nancy Butts rated it it was ok Shelves: Into this Flying Dutchman of a building comes recent engineering grad Iris Latch on a thankless assignment, and right away in the first chapter the author sets in motion an intriguing mystery that alternates between two protagonists in two different eras.

Everyone makes fun of Cleveland, but Pulley makes it come to life and reveals that there is a lot more to the city than anyone gives it credit for.

She writes easy-to-read barebones prose that reminded me at times of the old masters like Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett. The pace is good at the beginning and end of the novel.

However, I thought the middle section of the book was repetitive, with all the sleuthing circling over and over around the same few clues.

And the ending is unsatisfactory. Mar 21, Frank Steele rated it it was ok. Is there an editor in the house? I love the visual of the floating turkey, oh, and bacon too How did this book win an award?

Jan 31, Sojourner rated it it was amazing Shelves: It is a story that will take the reader back and forth between two eras and two distinctly different women who are caught up in the same mystery though their stories unfold twenty years apart.

One thread of the story is set in and follows a twenty-three years old civil engineer Iris Latch, who is assigned to survey an abandoned bank building.

Delighted to leave her boring workspace, Iris soon finds herself caught up in an abandoned building, which formerly housed the First Bank of Cleveland.

Interestingly, nothing seems to have been touched since that December night twenty years ago when the bank was shut. When Iris found the key to the safe-deposit box number , she unwittingly stumbled on a web of deceit and horrendous crime putting her life in mortal danger.

The parallel story follows sixteen-year-old Beatrice Baker, a secretary who works there in when the bank closes.

Both Iris and Beatrice find themselves caught up in the same mystery. Pulley is an engaging and superbly paced mystery about an abandoned bank building with a dangerous secret.

It is as much a story of greed as it is about deception and betrayal. Pulley as a first-time author is not without her shortcomings as the story seems to lack pace and depth at times, she has managed to pull off a coup of sort by bringing the story to a satisfying end.

By the way, D. It would be interesting to watch how her true identity unfolds. Last weekend my husband and I made the wise decision to drive to North Carolina for a wedding.

And I mean that in all seriousness. It was less expensive than flying, and just seven hours with stops, and the scenery was gorgeous, and we only bickered about my driving once okay, twice.

The Dead Key was our in-drive entertainment. And while it did offer many entertaining and gripping and clever moments, it also provided frustrating and inconsistent and boring one 2.

And while it did offer many entertaining and gripping and clever moments, it also provided frustrating and inconsistent and boring ones.

But I acknowledge that we have come a long way from the s, when the river kinda sorta caught on fire and the city kinda sorta went bankrupt, and the s, when the city was still combating corruption and poverty and perpetual sports losses.

The premise of The Dead Key is intriguing. In alternating timelines 20 years apart, two female protagonists are working and trying to solve a mystery in the same building.

In , 23 year-old Iris is an engineer surveying an ornate abandoned bank that mysteriously and abruptly closed two decades earlier.

Both soon realize that all is not as it seems at the bank, and past ghosts manifest as present dangers. She moved into a sparkling clean, brand spanking new apartment and had rats within days due to her inability to use a garbage can.

Beatrice was more likable, but not by much. Although both ladies displayed smarts and guts at times, I had no real emotional investment in their characters.

Loose ends are left untied. Good guys get hurt. I wanted more answers, more closure, more justice. But in many respects, that parallels real life.

The book would also have benefited from 50 at least less pages. There were unnecessary and extraneous details that slowed the story significantly.

Because, again, The Land. Feb 15, Lori Wentzel rated it liked it. The storyline was great. As I was in banking for a long time it intrigued me.

I kept reading because I wanted to find out what happened to Max and Beatrice. It was unbeliveable to me that a person as smart as she was valedictorian of h Good but It was unbeliveable to me that a person as smart as she was valedictorian of her class would be such a mess and it was hard to care for her.

She was just a mess lol. I refuse to finish a book anymore if it cannot hold my attention. Too many books to read for that!! For a first novel I would say this was a big success.

I really enjoyed this audiobook. One from and the other from We slowly see what is happening in with Beatrice and her Aunt Doris and Max.

I find myself enthralled with the Mystery of this story. Then you get transported to and Iris trying to figure out the My Opinion: Then you get transported to and Iris trying to figure out the mystery of why all this was left unsolved years ago.

Iris is sent out as a engineer to help her company make blueprints for The First Bank of Cleveland and discovers there is more than blueprints to be found.

Iris is trying to piece clues from the past and put them together and make some sort of sense of all that happened. I find myself captivated by this.

What was this bank hiding and why where they hiding it? I really enjoyed the story and felt the narrator did a good job with the narration.

The narrator with some of the accents that she did were good and made me smile. I would recommend this book and found that I really enjoyed this mystery of it all.

I was a little sad at the end. Overall, I enjoyed the book and the narration! One of my favorite lines in the audiobook - "A bank is only as good as its records.

Feb 16, Alaina rated it really liked it Shelves: Listen to the audio. The Dead Key was a pretty good book. I was interested and hooked from the start.

I just wanted to know how everything tied Beatrice to Iris within this book. Plus, this whole mysterious dead key was highly interesting.

Both women are completely different and I loved them both equally. I loved how the writing would go to the past and then the future. I think that D. Pulley did a really good job tying up loos Listen to the audio.

Pulley did a really good job tying up loose ends and making everything flow throughout the book. WHY did someone I like have to just die?

Then the whole finding out what happened to Max and Beatrice took forever. THEN the whole are they dead or are they living somewhere really cool took forever to find out as well.

I just wanted to know!! Other than that it was honestly a pretty interesting book. I was instantly sold on the whole kindle free part and that it had an audio.

Boy do I love my freaking audio books at work! Pulley rocks this one, and I surely hope this will be a series.

In , young Iris Latch, engineering graduate, commences her first-and unexciting-job in a structural engineering firm.

After three months of yeoman work, Iris is assigned a field job: Turn off your phone and tv and settle in for an engrossing read.

Sep 07, James Renner rated it it was amazing. A must-read for any native NE Ohio mystery lover and a great read or any fan of the genre.

I gave it a fifth star because Pulley set a couple scenes in the legendary Theatrical bar. I always love revisiting that place.

As a structure nut, I loved the way she wove two parallel stories one in the past, one in the near present together to tell a single mystery.

And the ending is courageous. Feb 16, Taryn rated it it was amazing. Intriguing and enjoyable This book kept me on edge. It was like a modern day treasure hunt combined with murder and intrigue.

There were so many plot twists, you never could fully guess what was next. The book kept me wanting more. The author did an excellent job tying it together in the end.

I knew nothing of safety deposit boxes before this book, so it was all the more fascinating. Excellent job to a new author.

Feb 05, Jeanne Johnson rated it really liked it. Great read Keeps you riveted to the story. Strong characters you can easily relate to and D.

Pulley has written a story that will keep readers coming back for more. I would have given 5 star rating if not for this. I will not read this author again for this reason.

Feb 23, Kay Mercuro rated it really liked it Shelves: Is there a sequel in the works? Would like to see what happened to Iris, Ramone and other characters after.

Feb 21, Patiscynical rated it it was ok. The plot seemed interesting. An old abandoned bank, a storyline spanning decades.

Iris, the main character from , a structural engineer, is working alone at the bank. Everything was left there when it closed; personnel records, personal items, files, keys, etc.

Why would anyone care about miscellaneous trash left I was underwhelmed.. Why would anyone care about miscellaneous trash left in an abandoned building 20 years?

And Iris is whiny, boring, and just plain dumb. Yeah, I said it. I kept hoping that someone would go ahead and shoot Iris, to put her out of my misery.

And who was whispering? Feb 22, Martha Mason rated it it was ok. But if this is the quality of work that is awarded a best new book or author or whatever it was named I cannot imagine what novels lost out on the honor!

The book reads like something written by a school girl. The language and descriptions sound as if they came from a comic book. The two "heroines" are not at all believable.

Oh, why go on? I suppose that I hoped that the book might improve. Jan 27, Fictionophile rated it liked it Shelves: Three factors enticed me to read this novel.

The first was the fact that it won the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award and the second was that my first career consisted of ten years working at a bank.

The third and decisive factor was that the fictional story was based on fact. The story is told via dual narratives twenty years apart.

Beatrice Davies, the heroine of the story — an Three factors enticed me to read this novel. The protagonist of the story is sixteen-year-old Beatrice, a sympathetic character, who in an attempt to escape from an appalling past, has come to Cleveland to live with her Aunt Doris.

Doris advises her to go to work for the First Bank of Cleveland and shows her how to dupe her employers into thinking she is old enough and smart enough to fill a secretarial position.

Little does she know that Doris herself once worked for the bank and she has ties to it still… Once working at the bank, Beatrice befriends Max, an attractive girl not much older than herself who has been investigating some suspicious activity within the bank.

Next we skip ahead twenty years and meet Iris Latch. Iris is a rookie engineer who hates her office job and is unhappy with life in general.

Twenty-three years old, Iris drinks too much, smokes too much, and lets her libido rule her brain more than she should.

Iris is not all that likeable a character, but her story is interesting all the same. The bank has been closed up for twenty years, but has a full-time security guard who lives on site.

That is strange in itself, but even stranger is the fact that many things have not been disturbed in all of those twenty years.

It is as though the bank is in a time warp. The cafeteria still has coffee in the machine. Personnel files were still in the filing cabinets.

Desks still have contents and photos displayed. Over time Iris comes to realize that the bank holds many questions begging to be asked.

She finds a key in a desk drawer and realizes it may be one of the many keys that were claimed to have been lost. The vault has safety deposit boxes and they are probably still full!

How can that be? Why would a real estate investment firm buy the building after all those years? What will happen to the contents of the bank?

The dead key of the title? It then has to be cleaned out and readied for another customer.

Written words conveyed the full force of a spell. The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life.

A number of spells are for magical amulets , which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.

Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value. Almost every Book of the Dead was unique, containing a different mixture of spells drawn from the corpus of texts available.

For most of the history of the Book of the Dead there was no defined order or structure. The spells in the Book of the Dead depict Egyptian beliefs about the nature of death and the afterlife.

The Book of the Dead is a vital source of information about Egyptian beliefs in this area. One aspect of death was the disintegration of the various kheperu , or modes of existence.

Mummification served to preserve and transform the physical body into sah , an idealised form with divine aspects; [29] the Book of the Dead contained spells aimed at preserving the body of the deceased, which may have been recited during the process of mummification.

The ka , or life-force, remained in the tomb with the dead body, and required sustenance from offerings of food, water and incense. In case priests or relatives failed to provide these offerings, Spell ensured the ka was satisfied.

It was the ba , depicted as a human-headed bird, which could "go forth by day" from the tomb into the world; spells 61 and 89 acted to preserve it.

An akh was a blessed spirit with magical powers who would dwell among the gods. The nature of the afterlife which the dead person enjoyed is difficult to define, because of the differing traditions within Ancient Egyptian religion.

In the Book of the Dead , the dead were taken into the presence of the god Osiris , who was confined to the subterranean Duat. There are also spells to enable the ba or akh of the dead to join Ra as he travelled the sky in his sun-barque, and help him fight off Apep.

There are fields, crops, oxen, people and waterways. The deceased person is shown encountering the Great Ennead , a group of gods, as well as his or her own parents.

While the depiction of the Field of Reeds is pleasant and plentiful, it is also clear that manual labour is required.

For this reason burials included a number of statuettes named shabti , or later ushebti. The path to the afterlife as laid out in the Book of the Dead was a difficult one.

The deceased was required to pass a series of gates, caverns and mounds guarded by supernatural creatures. Their names—for instance, "He who lives on snakes" or "He who dances in blood"—are equally grotesque.

These creatures had to be pacified by reciting the appropriate spells included in the Book of the Dead ; once pacified they posed no further threat, and could even extend their protection to the dead person.

If all the obstacles of the Duat could be negotiated, the deceased would be judged in the "Weighing of the Heart" ritual, depicted in Spell The deceased was led by the god Anubis into the presence of Osiris.

There, the dead person swore that he had not committed any sin from a list of 42 sins , [44] reciting a text known as the "Negative Confession".

Maat was often represented by an ostrich feather, the hieroglyphic sign for her name. If the scales balanced, this meant the deceased had led a good life.

Anubis would take them to Osiris and they would find their place in the afterlife, becoming maa-kheru , meaning "vindicated" or "true of voice".

This scene is remarkable not only for its vividness but as one of the few parts of the Book of the Dead with any explicit moral content. The judgment of the dead and the Negative Confession were a representation of the conventional moral code which governed Egyptian society.

For every "I have not John Taylor points out the wording of Spells 30B and suggests a pragmatic approach to morality; by preventing the heart from contradicting him with any inconvenient truths, it seems that the deceased could enter the afterlife even if their life had not been entirely pure.

A Book of the Dead papyrus was produced to order by scribes. They were commissioned by people in preparation for their own funeral, or by the relatives of someone recently deceased.

They were expensive items; one source gives the price of a Book of the Dead scroll as one deben of silver, [51] perhaps half the annual pay of a labourer.

In one case, a Book of the Dead was written on second-hand papyrus. Most owners of the Book of the Dead were evidently part of the social elite; they were initially reserved for the royal family, but later papyri are found in the tombs of scribes, priests and officials.

Towards the beginning of the history of the Book of the Dead , there are roughly 10 copies belonging to men for every one for a woman.

The dimensions of a Book of the Dead could vary widely; the longest is 40m long while some are as short as 1m.

The scribes working on Book of the Dead papyri took more care over their work than those working on more mundane texts; care was taken to frame the text within margins, and to avoid writing on the joints between sheets.

Books were often prefabricated in funerary workshops, with spaces being left for the name of the deceased to be written in later.

The text of a New Kingdom Book of the Dead was typically written in cursive hieroglyphs , most often from left to right, but also sometimes from right to left.

The hieroglyphs were in columns, which were separated by black lines — a similar arrangement to that used when hieroglyphs were carved on tomb walls or monuments.

Illustrations were put in frames above, below, or between the columns of text. The largest illustrations took up a full page of papyrus. From the 21st Dynasty onward, more copies of the Book of the Dead are found in hieratic script.

The calligraphy is similar to that of other hieratic manuscripts of the New Kingdom; the text is written in horizontal lines across wide columns often the column size corresponds to the size of the papyrus sheets of which a scroll is made up.

Occasionally a hieratic Book of the Dead contains captions in hieroglyphic. The text of a Book of the Dead was written in both black and red ink, regardless of whether it was in hieroglyphic or hieratic script.

Most of the text was in black, with red ink used for the titles of spells, opening and closing sections of spells, the instructions to perform spells correctly in rituals, and also for the names of dangerous creatures such as the demon Apep.

The style and nature of the vignettes used to illustrate a Book of the Dead varies widely. Some contain lavish colour illustrations, even making use of gold leaf.

Others contain only line drawings, or one simple illustration at the opening. Book of the Dead papyri were often the work of several different scribes and artists whose work was literally pasted together.

The existence of the Book of the Dead was known as early as the Middle Ages, well before its contents could be understood. In Karl Richard Lepsius published a translation of a manuscript dated to the Ptolemaic era and coined the name " Book of The Dead" das Todtenbuch.

He also introduced the spell numbering system which is still in use, identifying different spells. The work of E. Allen and Raymond O. The bank had the highest deposits and worked with the richest families - until it closed in - after the City of Cleveland went bankrupt.

The doors were chained in the middle of the night: The bank is now owned by some real estate holding company.

So technically, it does have a thirteenth floor. The time-frame is where a young engineer, Iris Latch, is volunteered to do a renovation feasibility study at the bank: The reason for the survey is: On her first day, whilst down in the banks vault , she meets the armed security guard, Ramone, who tells her some of the history of the bank, and why ten of the banks safe deposit boxes have been drilled open, whilst the hundreds of other boxes are still locked - possibly with a fortune still inside of them: The first day Saturday she helps with the surveying of first floor with Brad, walking around with her tape measure and clipboard It starts getting more interesting, when Iris reaches the third floor: Whilst surveying that area, she sits at a desk, lights a cigarette When she picks the box up though; a bronze key falls back into the metal drawer.

A key with the number etched onto it. Is it the key to one of the safe deposits in the banks vault? Who does it belong to? What does it mean? After a little investigation nose she finds a heavy bookcase, that has something behind it.

What secrets is she going to find? I really enjoyed this book. It alternates every few chapters between the two time-frames, and both Iris and Beatrice met and visited the same places and people.

And both women share the same trait: Never steal from a graveyard. You might disturb the ghosts. And the way both story threads linked, was intriguing.

View all 16 comments. Feb 08, Tifa rated it it was ok. If I were rating the s storyline and characters, this would have easily been 5 stars, but the portions were awful.

There were a lot of points where I had to suspend my disbelief because my mother helped run a bank in the 70s, and things were nothing like this.

I continued read If I were rating the s storyline and characters, this would have easily been 5 stars, but the portions were awful.

I continued reading it only because I truly cared about the year-old while I was happy skimming the parts about the so-called valedictorian professional who supposedly figured things out.

View all 5 comments. All I can say is: The plot is generic, there is nothing new or refreshing and worst of all the characters are all exceptionally stupid - as a few others have pointed out.

What were the contest judges thinking? From page ONE I knew the author knew nothing about her subject and that ruined it for me.

Pulley ever set foot in a real bank? A female bank employee hides in the restroom of her bank until everyone goes home oh boy is that original.

Does the author really think banks are also so stupid as to let people have their run of the place after hours? Yet we are expected to believe this naive girl calmly hands her accomplice never explains how he gets in!

BOTH keys to safe deposit boxes so he can pilfer them at will. Gee, I think even in banks still operated on the simple safeguard that the bank only has one of the two keys required to open the box and the box owner had the other.

How does she manage to get both keys? You think this is a minor detail? Well - the entire plot of the book rests on this! Amazon has canceled the ABNA contest and if this drivel was the result, no wonder.

What a complete disappointment! View all 13 comments. I found it amazing that you could just shut down a bank and leave everything as it is for twenty years.

That was a very interesting idea for a book. Slowly the mystery starts to unravel I liked the book, but I also find it sometimes a bit slow paced, not that it became boring.

But it never really got me totally I found it amazing that you could just shut down a bank and leave everything as it is for twenty years.

But it never really got me totally engrossed into the story. It was more my own willpower to read than the story that sometimes kept me going.

But still, it was interesting. I wanted to know how it all came to be that the bank closed down. But I had some problems with the main characters.

It got a bit exciting towards the end when everything came together, but I was a bit disappointed about the ending.

I turned the last page and that was it and I felt a bit let down. But all and all it was a good read, the book was well written and the concept felt new.

Feb 16, Heather Stephens rated it it was amazing. This book is amazing. This novel keeps you guessing right til the end.

View all 3 comments. Here let me start off with an important rule: Mind your own business. Oh no, curiosity killed nosy people. For some reason certain people just have to know the answer to everything: Iris and Beatrice, the protagonists, are prime examples.

I was waiting for these women to be chopped to bits and found in an industrial sized freezer years later.

At least Beatrice had the sense to be careful with her pseudo-investigation. Iris just let it all hang out figuratively speaking.

I kept hitting my forehead in response to her ridiculous actions. Just the way she went about questioning people and telling everyone what she was looking into made me roll my eyes.

She might as well have held a sign that read: Other than my utter disbelief that the protagonists could unravel a mystery and still survive, I was thoroughly entertained by the novel.

It was cleverly done! The mystery and suspense had me on the edge of my seat, and had me trying to figure everything out. What can I say? I am the heavyweight champ of plot guessing It has a slow start but picks up very quickly.

On a side note, the love interest factor was unnecessary, in my honest opinion. Other than that, I very much enjoyed the read. The Dead Key is D.

After reading and being immersed in this mystery, I can understand the awards. Two timelines and protagonists come together to solve the my The Dead Key is D.

In , Beatrice Baker takes a secretarial job at 16 and begins to find that there are secrets to kill for at the First Bank of Cleveland. In , Iris Latch is an engineer sent to the bank to do a floor to floor survey for buyers interested in the old bank building.

She finds many rooms, offices and files exactly as they were the day the bank locked its doors in Even though there is a twenty year time span, both young women become endangered as they try to understand the importance of the keys to the safe deposit boxes in the vault.

I really enjoyed the two intertwining timelines and protagonists. Beatrice was a much more sympathetic and strong character. She faces extremely difficult personal problems and dangerous situations for her young age.

Iris hates her job, parties too much and is not very responsible. I feel many of us at that age can relate to boring first office jobs, wanting to get away from home and few friends which can lead to bad judgement at times.

Plot twists, spooky atmosphere and an interesting mystery makes for a very happy reader. I recommend this book highly. Feb 09, Daniel rated it it was ok.

I really am debating between two and three stars. The book is a mystery that goes back and forth between and The side of the story is far more interesting, and the characters are reasonably more likable.

Unfortunately the story is the main story, and the main character is a total loser. She is supposedly a super smart engineer that is driven to succeed, but she continually smokes, gets drunk, sleeps around, and is all around lazy.

I did not sympathize with her at all. I also I really am debating between two and three stars. It is too long of a book to read about characters you kind of hate.

View all 6 comments. Iris Latch is unhappy in her new job at a Cleveland engineering firm. She gets handed grunt work to do Then, out of nowhere, she is asked to complete a special project.

She is to draw floor plans for the First Bank of Cleveland building. The bank closed 20 years before in after a scandal of some sort involving s Iris Latch is unhappy in her new job at a Cleveland engineering firm.

The bank closed 20 years before in after a scandal of some sort involving safe deposit boxes and incomplete banking records.

Iris has no idea when she enters the dusty time capsule of dusty marble and gold trim that a young bank employee stumbled on a crime so big that it imploded some of the wealthiest families in Cleveland and ruined The First Bank of Cleveland.

A crime so big that it is still very dangerous to go poking around the dark, closed building. Beatrice in and Iris in will share in the fear very, very soon, even if they are 20 years apart in time.

This is such a suspenseful and interesting story!! I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Emily Sutton-Smith, and the details are so vivid that I could imagine being in that dusty, dark creepy bank building.

The time jumps just heightened the suspense, rather than making the plot confusing. I felt sorry for both women and could imagine how scary both situations would be.

The suspense and mystery build until the very last page of this story! Best suspense story I have come across in a long time!

The story kept my attention to the very end. The audiobook is just under 14 hours long. Emily Sutton-Smith read at a nice even pace, and her voice was perfect!

I have hearing loss, and sometimes female voices are difficult for me to understand. But I had no problem hearing and understanding this audiobook. I am definitely going to read more by D.

Mar 01, Nancy Butts rated it it was ok Shelves: Into this Flying Dutchman of a building comes recent engineering grad Iris Latch on a thankless assignment, and right away in the first chapter the author sets in motion an intriguing mystery that alternates between two protagonists in two different eras.

Everyone makes fun of Cleveland, but Pulley makes it come to life and reveals that there is a lot more to the city than anyone gives it credit for.

She writes easy-to-read barebones prose that reminded me at times of the old masters like Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett.

The pace is good at the beginning and end of the novel. However, I thought the middle section of the book was repetitive, with all the sleuthing circling over and over around the same few clues.

And the ending is unsatisfactory. Mar 21, Frank Steele rated it it was ok. Is there an editor in the house? I love the visual of the floating turkey, oh, and bacon too How did this book win an award?

Jan 31, Sojourner rated it it was amazing Shelves: It is a story that will take the reader back and forth between two eras and two distinctly different women who are caught up in the same mystery though their stories unfold twenty years apart.

One thread of the story is set in and follows a twenty-three years old civil engineer Iris Latch, who is assigned to survey an abandoned bank building.

Delighted to leave her boring workspace, Iris soon finds herself caught up in an abandoned building, which formerly housed the First Bank of Cleveland.

Interestingly, nothing seems to have been touched since that December night twenty years ago when the bank was shut.

When Iris found the key to the safe-deposit box number , she unwittingly stumbled on a web of deceit and horrendous crime putting her life in mortal danger.

The parallel story follows sixteen-year-old Beatrice Baker, a secretary who works there in when the bank closes. Both Iris and Beatrice find themselves caught up in the same mystery.

Pulley is an engaging and superbly paced mystery about an abandoned bank building with a dangerous secret. It is as much a story of greed as it is about deception and betrayal.

Pulley as a first-time author is not without her shortcomings as the story seems to lack pace and depth at times, she has managed to pull off a coup of sort by bringing the story to a satisfying end.

By the way, D. It would be interesting to watch how her true identity unfolds. Last weekend my husband and I made the wise decision to drive to North Carolina for a wedding.

And I mean that in all seriousness. It was less expensive than flying, and just seven hours with stops, and the scenery was gorgeous, and we only bickered about my driving once okay, twice.

The Dead Key was our in-drive entertainment. And while it did offer many entertaining and gripping and clever moments, it also provided frustrating and inconsistent and boring one 2.

And while it did offer many entertaining and gripping and clever moments, it also provided frustrating and inconsistent and boring ones.

But I acknowledge that we have come a long way from the s, when the river kinda sorta caught on fire and the city kinda sorta went bankrupt, and the s, when the city was still combating corruption and poverty and perpetual sports losses.

The premise of The Dead Key is intriguing. In alternating timelines 20 years apart, two female protagonists are working and trying to solve a mystery in the same building.

In , 23 year-old Iris is an engineer surveying an ornate abandoned bank that mysteriously and abruptly closed two decades earlier.

Both soon realize that all is not as it seems at the bank, and past ghosts manifest as present dangers. She moved into a sparkling clean, brand spanking new apartment and had rats within days due to her inability to use a garbage can.

Beatrice was more likable, but not by much. Although both ladies displayed smarts and guts at times, I had no real emotional investment in their characters.

Loose ends are left untied. Good guys get hurt. I wanted more answers, more closure, more justice. But in many respects, that parallels real life.

The book would also have benefited from 50 at least less pages. There were unnecessary and extraneous details that slowed the story significantly.

Because, again, The Land. Feb 15, Lori Wentzel rated it liked it. The storyline was great. As I was in banking for a long time it intrigued me.

I kept reading because I wanted to find out what happened to Max and Beatrice. It was unbeliveable to me that a person as smart as she was valedictorian of h Good but It was unbeliveable to me that a person as smart as she was valedictorian of her class would be such a mess and it was hard to care for her.

She was just a mess lol. I refuse to finish a book anymore if it cannot hold my attention. Too many books to read for that!!

For a first novel I would say this was a big success. I really enjoyed this audiobook. One from and the other from We slowly see what is happening in with Beatrice and her Aunt Doris and Max.

I find myself enthralled with the Mystery of this story. Then you get transported to and Iris trying to figure out the My Opinion: Then you get transported to and Iris trying to figure out the mystery of why all this was left unsolved years ago.

Iris is sent out as a engineer to help her company make blueprints for The First Bank of Cleveland and discovers there is more than blueprints to be found.

Iris is trying to piece clues from the past and put them together and make some sort of sense of all that happened.

I find myself captivated by this. What was this bank hiding and why where they hiding it? I really enjoyed the story and felt the narrator did a good job with the narration.

The narrator with some of the accents that she did were good and made me smile. I would recommend this book and found that I really enjoyed this mystery of it all.

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